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Energy Benchmarking

Energy benchmarking is the comparison of a building’s energy consumption against similar buildings while accounting for a variety of factors such as weather, fuel type, building construction, occupancy, etc. This is the  first step in determining energy conservation potential of a property as well as the potential to undergo a full investigation by performing an energy audit.

Energy benchmarking provides the owner with a priority list of which buildings are performing well and which are under-performing. The ability to highlight the assets within a real estate portfolio that are poor performers will aid in the proper allocation of a client’s time and money.

The goals of energy benchmarking:

To identify opportunities for reducing energy with a low first cost effort
Assess current performance
Prioritize facilities for improvements
Set appropriate goals
Evaluate and Measure progress
Rank facility performance against its peers

 

Benchmark Report Card from Nova

The Benchmark Report Card from SEG will provide you with answers to the following questions:

How much am I spending on utilities?
How does my building’s energy use compare to other similar buildings?
Where are the opportunities to reduce my utility expenses?
Is there a cost effective opportunity to improve the financial performance of my property through an energy construction project?

 

After receiving your Benchmark Report Card, a professional from SEG will contact you to answer questions and discuss opportunities for your building.

 

Benchmarking with Portfolio Manager

Developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) through Energy Star, a software tool known as  Portfolio Manager is available to benchmark a variety of building types. Using Portfolio Manager to energy benchmark investment priorities, track energy savings, highlight poor energy performance in buildings are steps toward an Energy Star rating for your building.

An energy benchmarking score of 75 or greater will earn the building an US Department of Energy ENERGY STAR® Label.

 

Multifamily Buildings Now Eligible to Earn a 1-100 Score from Energy Star

As of September 16, 2014, multifamily properties can now earn a 1-100 score from Energy Star.  If your property receives an score of 75 or higher in Portfolio Manager, it may be eligible to be certified by Energy Star, signifying that it is among America’s top energy performers.

Being certified with a multifamily Energy Star Certification identifies you as “Green.”  Green valuation benefits building owners and investors by reducing operating expenses, attracting better and higher rents, increasing occupancy and increasing resale value.

Nova is an Energy Star Partner.  We have benchmarked almost 300 buildings in Portfolio Manager and know the common pitfalls that make the process difficult for landlords. Hiring Nova to take you through the process ensures it will go quicker, easier and results will be more accurate.

Energy Benchmarking and Disclosure Compliance

 

IMT_USbenchmarking_060515

 

Click on each state in the list below for energy benchmarking policies in that state.

CaliforniaGeorgiaIllinoisMarylandMassachusettsMinnesotaMissouriNew YorkPennsylvaniaOregonTexasWashingtonWashington, DC
California
California
In California, the Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program (AB 1103) will take effect on January 1, 2014.

Under the Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program (AB 1103),  nonresidential buildings greater than 5,000 sf will be benchmarked using Energy Star’s Portfolio Manager.  A building’s energy use must be disclosed to buyers, lenders and lessees.

AB 1103 will be implemented on the following schedule:

Building Size Original Deadline New Deadline
More than 10,000 sq ft January 1, 2014 No change
5,000 to 10,000 sq ft July 1, 2014 July 1, 2016

Find a helpful summary of the program here.

Learn more at the California Energy Commission by Clicking Here.

San Francisco
The San Francisco Existing Commercial Buildings Energy Performance Ordinance was passed in 2011. Building Owners are required to benchmark building energy use.

The Existing Commercial Buildings Energy Performance Ordinance was passed in 2011. Non residential buildings greater than 10,000 Sf will be benchmarked using Energy Star’s Portfolio Manager on the following schedule:

Benchmark data is due April 1st annually.

The city will impose the following fines for non-compliance:

Size Daily Fine Maximum Fine per Violation
>50,000 sf $100 $2,500
25,000-49,999 sf $50 $1,500

 

Other requirements:

Buildings must have energy audits performed every 5 years starting on the following schedule:

Nov. 15 2012 for buildings > 50,000 SqFt (ASHRAE Level II)
April 1, 2013 for buildings between 25,000 and 49,999 SqFt (ASHRAE Level I)
April 1, 2013 for buildings between 10,000 and 24,999 SqFt (ASHRAE Level 1)

Learn more at the Department of the City and County of San Francisco by Clicking Here.

Georgia

Atlanta

On April 21, 2015 Atlanta’s city council unanimously passed a comprehensive energy and water efficiency policy that will require energy benchmarking and audits for large commercial buildings.  The policy will be rolled out on the following schedule:

2015: Municipal buildings 10,000 square feet and larger and non-city owned buildings over 50,000 square feet are required to submit energy benchmarking data.  This data will not be shared publicly for private buildings.

September 2016: The same building types as above. This year the data will be shared publicly

September 2017: Buildings between 25,000 and 50,000 square feet will be required to submit energy benchmarking data

Compliance with the audit requirement will begin in 2016 and run on a 10 year cycle.

Illinois
Chicago, IL
The City of Chicago Energy Benchmarking Ordinance was passed on September 11 , 2013.

All  buildings 50,000 sf and greater  must benchmark their energy and water consumption using Energy Star’s Portfolio Manager. Under this ordinance, approximately 3,500 commercial, residential and municipal buildings will be required to participate.

The Ordinance will be implemented on the following schedule:

June 2014: commercial buildings 250,000 + sf

June 2015: commercial buildings  50,000 – 250,000 sf and residential buildings 250,000 + sf

June 2016: residential buildings 50,000-250,000 sf

Enforcement

Failure to comply with the Ordinance will subject the owner to a fine of up to $100 for the first violation and an additional fine of up to $25 per day that the particular violation continues.

The city will publicly disclose individual building energy performance starting in June 2015 and 1 year after data has been reported for each building

Read the ordinance here 

Maryland
Montgomery County

Montgomery County, Md., has become the first county in the nation to pass an energy benchmarking law, requiring owners of large nonresidential buildings to track and report their properties’ energy use.  

The Ordinance will be implemented on the following schedule:

June 1, 2015: county-owned non-residential buildings

December 1, 2016: privately owned non-residential buildings greater than 250,000 square feet

December 1, 2017: privately owned non-residential buildings 50,000 to 250,000 square feet

Massachusetts
Boston
The City of Boston Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance was passed in April of 2013.

All city-owned buildings, commercial buildings 35,000 sf and greater and residential buildings 35,000 sf and greater or with 35 units must benchmark their energy and water consumption using Energy Star’s Portfolio Manager.

The Ordinance will be implemented on the following schedule:
May 15, 2014: Commercial buildings >50,000 SqFT (or two or more buildings on the same parcel totaling >100,000 SqFt)

May 15, 2015: Residential buildings >50,000 SqFt or >50 Units
May 15, 2016: Commercial buildings between 35,000 and 49,999 SqFt
May 15, 2017: Residential buildings between 35,000 and 49,999 SqFt or 35-50 units

Failure for reporting non-compliance may be penalized a per day violation with a total fine of no more than $3,000 per calendar year.

Cambridge
The City of Cambridge Energy Use and Disclosure Ordinance was passed in July of 2014.

Building Energy Usage and Disclosure Ordinance (BEUDO), requiring the  benchmarking and disclosure of building energy performance for large commercial, institutional, and multifamily buildings.

The Ordinance requires the following building types to benchmark their energy use

Municipal 10,000 SqFt or greater

Commercial and Institutional 25,000 SqFt and greater

Multifamily with 50 or more units

Minnesota
Minneapolis
Minneapolis passed a rating and disclosure of building energy use ordinance in 2013.

The ordinance applies to the following:

Government buildings >25,000 SqFt

Commercial buildings >50,000 SqFt

The Ordinance is implemented on the following schedule:

May 1, 2013: All city-owned buildings
May 1, 2014: All Class 2 buildings (>100,000 SqFt of an occupancy use other than residential or industrial)
May 1, 2015: All Class 1 buildings (between 50,000 and 100,000 SqFt of an occupancy use other than residential or industrial)

And every May 1st thereafter

 Click here for more information

Missouri
Kansas City

The City Council of Kansas City, Missouri, passed an Energy Empowerment Ordinance addressing energy use in existing municipal, commercial and residential buildings.  Under the ordinance, building owners will be required to track whole-building energy and water consumption and report it annually to the city.

The Ordinance will be implemented on the following schedule:

2016: Municipal buildings over 10,000 square feet

2017: Commercial and multifamily buildings over 100,000 square feet

2018: Commercial and multifamily buildings over 50,000 square feet

New York
New York
New York, NY Local Law 84 was passed in 2009.  It requires building owners to benchmark and disclose building energy performance.

Local Law 84 of 2009 (or the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan) requires the benchmarking and public disclosure of building energy performance and water consumption through Energy Star’s Portffolio Manager; periodic energy audits and building “tune-ups” known as retro commissioning; lighting upgrades; the sub metering of large tenant spaces; and improvements to the city’s building energy code.

The city will impose fines for non-compliance on the following schedule:

May 1: $500

Aug 1: $1,000

Nov 1: $1,500

Need to know if you’re on the list for Local Law 84 compliance? Click here for the covered buildings list prepared by nyc.gov.

Click here to learn more about Local Law 84 at NYC.gov

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
Philadelphia passed the Energy Conservation Ordinance in 2012.  Building Owners are required to benchmark building energy use.

The Energy Conservation Ordinance passed on June 1, 2012. Non-residential buildings of more than 50,000 square feet are required to benchmark energy and water consumption through Energy Star’s Portfolio Manager.

Deadlines: Every year by June 30.
The city imposes a fine of $300 for the first 30 days an owner fails to comply and $100 for each subsequent day.

Energy Benchmarking Compliance Period Now Open! Building owners can now report their 2014 energy and water usage by visiting www.phila.gove/benchmarking and clicking Get Started.

Access the forms needed for benchmarking in Philadelphia here. 

Oregon

Portland

On Earth Day, 2015, the Portland City Council approved requirements for owners of commercial buildings over 20,000 square feet to track energy use and report it annually.

Reporting requirements will begin in 2016 for buildings over 50,000 square feet and 2017 for 20,000 square feet and above.

Texas
Austin, TX
The Energy Conservation Audit and Disclosure Ordinance was passed in 2008. It applies to commercial and multifamily building owners.

The ordinance requires the following:

1. Sellers of single-family homes >10 years old must disclose results of a required energy audit at least 3 days before the end of the “option period”
2. Commercial and multifamily properties must benchmark their buildings using Energy Star’s Portfolio Manager and report the energy rating on any building >10 years old and >10,000 SqFt
3. Multifamily properties with energy usage per square foot exceeding 150% of the average for similar buildings must reduce energy by 40% and must disclose to tenants the designation of the property. This is also true for Condo owners of 5 or more units at the same location. Multifamily properties > 10 years must have energy audits performed every 10 years.

Benchmark data is due on June 1 annually.

Click here for more information.

Washington
Washington
Washington’s SB 5854 is modeled after California’s AB 1103 and requires energy use disclosure at the time of transaction.

Under the Efficiency First Bill  (SB 5854),  all commercial buildings greater than 10,000 sf are required to rate energy performance by benchmarking the property in Energy Star’s Portfolio Manager.  Ratings must be disclosed to all prospective buyers, lessees and lenders prior to the closing of the transation.

All public buildings greater than 10,000 sf must have an investment grade energy audit completed if the Energy Star score is less than 50.  Cost effective measures must be implemented by 2016.

State agencies cannot lease or renew a lease in a privately owned building with a score of less than 75

SB 5854 has already been implemented for all building sizes.

Read the bill as passed in legislation here.

Seattle, WA
The Seattle Building Energy Benchmarking and Reporting Legislation was passed in 2010. Commercial and Multifamily building owners  must benchmark their buildings’ energy use.

The Seattle Building Energy Benchmarking and Reporting Legislation was passed in January 2010. The Ordinance requires Commercial and Multifamily building owners (5+ units) to conduct annual energy performance tracking through Energy Star Portfolio Manager. Building owners must disclose a statement of energy performance to current tenants and prospective buyers, tenants and lenders.

Benchmark data is due on April 1 annually.

The city imposes quarterly fines for non-compliance at the following levels:

Size Quarterly Fine
>50,000 sf $1,000
20,000 – 49,999 sf $500

 

Learn more at the Seattle Office of Sustainability and Environment by clicking here.

Washington, DC
Washington, DC
The Clean and Affordable Energy Act of 2008. The Ordinance requires Commercial and Residential (50,000 to 200,000 square feet) as well as City (10,000 square feet and up) building owners to conduct annual energy performance tracking through Energy Star Portfolio Manager.

Benchmark data is due annually on April 1.

Building owners and nonresidential tenants who fail to comply with reporting requirements are subject to fines of $100 per day for each day of noncompliance. Owners will not be penalized for reporting partial benchmarking information, provided they comply with all partial benchmarking requirements.

Learn more at the District Department of the Environment by Clicking here.

Contact Us

Keely Felton | Strategic Energy Group | E-mail | 207-939-4983